N and I have been away for a while due to our jobs, but one thing is for certain…Neither of our editors know about us. So, we’re still venting our (and your) frustrations if you send them to us. 
Last time I checked, at least one of our editors follows this frustrated ball of fur on Twitter. But, he’s never going to know. 
The election is very close…So, what’s frustrating you in your newsrooms?
- C

N and I have been away for a while due to our jobs, but one thing is for certain…Neither of our editors know about us. So, we’re still venting our (and your) frustrations if you send them to us. 

Last time I checked, at least one of our editors follows this frustrated ball of fur on Twitter. But, he’s never going to know. 

The election is very close…So, what’s frustrating you in your newsrooms?

- C

 misterlavine said: It’s unfortunate because I’m studying at a community college with no student publication. When I transfer, though, I can’t wait to get involved.

That is unfortunate, but if you decide not to transfer maybe you should look into starting one with a journalism or English professor as an advisor. Building a publication from the ground up… talk about a learning experience and a resume builder!

—N

Anonymous asked: Any advice for a freshman journalism student?

Get involved! Apply for internships! Pay attention to current events! Read!

Seriously though, get involved in your student newspaper. My biggest regret of college isn’t that one drunken night at that one party that one time. It’s that I didn’t get involved in my student paper earlier. I waited until my senior year and I could have learned so much more if I had been there sooner.

—N

Anonymous asked: I'm a senior in j-school and I work for the campus paper and have had an internship, but that's not enough, at least according to professors. The truth is, I apply for just about everything and am constantly turned down. I get good feedback from professors, but have never felt validated by a real-life journo. Now my mom is really pushing another career when I graduate. I want to do journalism, but it feels like the world doesn't want that. What do I do? — Love, tired and frustrated journo kitten

If you want to be a journalist and feel a passion for the news, stick with it. It’s not easy to find a job today in this industry. It took me almost a year from graduation to find a full-time job after working part time and doing an internship and I’m still living paycheck to paycheck. But it’s a job that I enjoy and it’s what I’ve always wanted to do.

The best advice I can give you is this: Don’t turn down something because it’s part time or an internship if you can still afford to survive. There’s a saying that goes, “You have to have a job to get a job.” Also, you’ve got to be willing to move. If you’re from a small town, the newspaper may employee only two or three reporters. There’s not a lot of room to hire someone else. Choose the clips that you send to editors carefully. They should show off your best work and be error-free. Contact newspapers and ask if they need freelancers. A lot of small town newspapers may want to use a freelancer for writing or copy editing. Put your portfolio online to show off any multimedia skills you may have and. Wordpress offers some very basic layouts that anyone can use. Unfortunately, a lot of reporters that are newcomers to the field are competing with veterans who have been laid off. You need to stand out.

Most importantly, don’t give up. If you’ve got heart and are willing to work your way up, it will come… It just might take some patience.

—N

So, I love how people think that you just magically wrote better than normal and made it to the front page. When in reality, our editors tell us it has to be front page worthy. At least that’s how it works here. 
-Anonymous
You’re right, anon. I’m frequently told “Write it for page 1” or “It’s an inside story, so don’t spend a lot of time on it.” I also appreciate being told something like “Good job for getting a story on the front page! And you’re so young, too!” —N
Submitted to us.

So, I love how people think that you just magically wrote better than normal and made it to the front page. When in reality, our editors tell us it has to be front page worthy. At least that’s how it works here. 

-Anonymous

You’re right, anon. I’m frequently told “Write it for page 1” or “It’s an inside story, so don’t spend a lot of time on it.” I also appreciate being told something like “Good job for getting a story on the front page! And you’re so young, too!” —N

Submitted to us.

My life. 
Submitted to us.

My life. 

Submitted to us.

"Goodies from PR team arrive in office"
"Ooooh. *Chucks away press release*"
We didn’t do well in our college ethics class.
—N
Submitted to us.

"Goodies from PR team arrive in office"

"Ooooh. *Chucks away press release*"

We didn’t do well in our college ethics class.

—N

Submitted to us.

"Calls story"
"Finds out after writing it that it’s already taken"
Submitted to us.

"Calls story"

"Finds out after writing it that it’s already taken"

Submitted to us.

"Finally find contact’s number"
"He won’t answer any of your questions"
Submitted to us.

"Finally find contact’s number"

"He won’t answer any of your questions"

Submitted to us.

"While covering a story, was asked if I wrote for the school paper."
"I was at a middle school."
Don’t feel bad. I approached a state house candidate for an interview at a forum. He must have noticed my reporter’s notebook in hand because he said, “You can’t be a reporter. You’re 15 years old!”
—N
Submitted to us.

"While covering a story, was asked if I wrote for the school paper."

"I was at a middle school."

Don’t feel bad. I approached a state house candidate for an interview at a forum. He must have noticed my reporter’s notebook in hand because he said, “You can’t be a reporter. You’re 15 years old!”

—N

Submitted to us.